Minimizing pops and clicks with vinyl - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Source & Line > Analogue Source

Analogue Source Turntables, Tonearms, Cartridges, Phono Stages, Tuners, Tape Recorders, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th July 2007, 03:40 AM   #1
Jeb-D. is offline Jeb-D.  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Jeb-D.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SoCal
Default Minimizing pops and clicks with vinyl

Sorry, I'm sure this has been asked a million times, but I can't seem to find much good info. Anyhow, the age of turntables was back when I was a yongster. I just inherited a turntable(an old technics SL1200) from my grandma. I designed a preamp for it which works damn well. All tube, but no audible noise or hum.

With that said, I have no clue on the general practices of getting the best performance vinyl reproduction! Any recommended information, websites or products would be really appreciated.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th July 2007, 04:04 AM   #2
maxro is offline maxro  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
maxro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Survey says: Least happiest city in Canada
Default Re: Minimizing pops and clicks with vinyl

Quote:
Originally posted by Jeb-D.
I just inherited a turntable(an old technics SL1200) from my grandma.
Was your grandma a DJ?

I would advise a wet washing of noisy LPs (a search here ought to uncover some home brew solutions) and a dry brushing with a carbon fibre brush on all LPs before each playing.
__________________
"No one likes jazz that much; even the guy playing it had to take drugs." -Bart Simpson
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th July 2007, 04:27 AM   #3
Jeb-D. is offline Jeb-D.  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Jeb-D.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SoCal
Quote:
Was your grandma a DJ?
Ha! Good one. No, she wasn't, it's an older one from the 70's. I know their popular with DJ's, but perhaps it was just a popular model then.

Thanks for the tips.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th July 2007, 12:49 AM   #4
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
kevinkr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Blog Entries: 6
Look at any of the homebrew record cleaner threads here, there is a wealth of information on cleaning LP's and a machine is far superior to any other approach. (I just knuckled under and built one early this year.)

My DIY record cleaner.

Details of several diy cleaners including mine can be found on the above thread. Mine cost about $80 total and more judicious shopping could get that down considerably.
__________________
"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence." - Carl Sagan
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2007, 08:43 PM   #5
Jeb-D. is offline Jeb-D.  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Jeb-D.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SoCal
Those are pretty sweet cleaners. I probably couldn't get around to building anything like that for a while.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st August 2007, 02:17 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
cactuscowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Powell, Wyoming
Proper cleaning with a wet/vac machine is essential, especially with thrift shop or garage sale discs.

You might also want to check the stylus for wear or damage. I generally buy a new cartridge for most of the vintage turntables I acquire.
__________________
OIIIIIIIO
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th September 2007, 07:40 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Hi. Some cartridges and stylus profiles are better than others regarding surface noise inmunity.
A very good one is Stanton 500 v.3, actually a DJ cart that tracks on the heavier side (2/5 grams)... a lot of people at the Vinyl Engine were surprised with the sound quality and gusto.
It´s a very cheap cart, utterly rugged, and sounds good.
And if you can find a vintage version -champagne enamelled body-better still. Check out garage sales, flkea markets etc.
There are lots of different styli to that cart. Some of them NOS, some of them new, some of them of aftermarket manufacturers...
Styli for Pickering v15 cartridge (different manufacturer, same cart) fits Stanton 500´s too.
Sometimes an spherical tip works wonders with old vinyl, with less surface noise than an elliptical.
But sometimes is the inverse!! That´s, maybe, because some elliptical tips ride on an ¨untouched¨ part of the groove .

Check out the old Shure M44 too. Some folks said it´s a ¨best kept secret¨.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th September 2007, 08:20 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Default another tip -no pun intended-...

...is to fiddle with the capacitance/resistance that loads the cartridge. If you have made the phono preamp, It´ll be easier for you to modify a little the suggested values -each cartridge manufacturer has them in the datasheets- to obtain the desired effect.
I´m tempted to use some variable air capacitors -AFAIK, old radio ítems-, and some variable resistors too, at the input of my preamp. I haven´t done it yet, but maybe it´ll be an useful idea for you.

Regarding wet cleaning of vinyl ¨on the cheap¨, my suggestion is to use some photograph wetting agent (commonly, a very pure form of non-ionic detergent).
You must dilute a tiny part in distilled water. Then, scrub your disk with a Disc Doctor brush or similar (you can make a diy one, very effective, using some polipropylene fiber strip that aluminum frame window makers use, as sealant, in the sliding parts of the windows...).
If you put the lp in vertical position when it´s still wet, the surfactant/water mix will do a better job of removing the ¨soil¨. Gravity helps here. Due to the low surface tension of the liquid, crud will flow slowly downwards. If you put a white dish below the lp, you´ll be amazed because of the colour of the water... garage finds have lot of years of filth on it´s grooves.
Then, you must rinse carefully your lp´s with distilled water. Let them air dry in a quiet place, in vertical position. If you are in a hurry, you can dry them with some kleenex, but I have noticed that, in general, drying sheets (whatever you use) leave residues.
Best vacuum. Next best: evaporation.

My two cents.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th September 2007, 09:47 PM   #9
Jeb-D. is offline Jeb-D.  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Jeb-D.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SoCal
Quote:
Check out the old Shure M44 too. Some folks said it´s a ¨best kept secret¨.
Odd you should mention it. That was the cartridge that was in the turntable when I got it. However, the stylus was no good and I had no luck finding a replacement. So, I got a different cartridge. I still do have the M44 though, if you have a stylus to recommend?

Quote:
rinse carefully your lp´s with distilled water. Let them air dry in a quiet place, in vertical position. If you are in a hurry, you can dry them with some kleenex, but I have noticed that, in general, drying sheets (whatever you use) leave residues.
Have you tried rubbing alcohol? Some people say it works well, and it evaporates relatively quickly.

Now that my pre-amp is de-bugged, I'm pretty happy with the sound of my cartridge/ pre-amp combo. Most of the LP's I have from the 80's have very little noise, but my older stuff needs a good washin'.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th September 2007, 10:25 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
I think -but I don´t know really- that rubbing alcohol is the same as isopropanol, or isopropyl alcohol. For really dirty stuff is good, but there are some complaints about it attacking the plasticizers in the vinyl itself. I don´t know if someone done some test about it, or if it´s only another urban legend.
Isopropanol comes in various grades of purity. I have used what I can get at the electronics store (usually employed to clean PCB´s).
It´s better to use it diluted in distilled water, or added to the mix mentioned before.
I think that the different diy brews made to clean vinyl are more or less a hit or miss affair: what works good for you, maybe does not work best for another guy.
If you buy a lot of used vinyl, flea market ie., your needs are very different to the ones of the guy who buys mint vinyl. You need heavy fuel, hard rubbing and patience. So, a more powerful mixture is needed.
People with vacuum machines, or mint vinyl, can opt for a more decaffeinated version. Check out, cause there are lots of recipes in the net.

Concerning Shure M44, that was an inmensely popular cartridge in the 60´s and 70´s. Versatile and dependable, it can accomodate different styli, even 78 rpm ones.
According to Steve Hoffman ears, is a very nice cart to play beaten up vinyl (Steve is a mastering engineer of vast knowledge, check out http://www.stevehoffman.tv/forums/)
According to my ears too: sounds hot -has lots of output-, very ¨analoguey¨, with some of a vintage feel.
If you put there a n55e stylus (elliptical), you´ll have an engaging and reasonably accurate cartridge for very little money. It will sound very good in your Technics, because is a good match to the tonearm...
Another option would be the n44e stylus -another elliptical-, or a N44 7 stylus (conical, medium tracking force).
The original n44c stylus, originated in the sixties, is a heavier tracking animal, with almost 10 mv output: dj stuff that can be used at home if one is careful.
Check out the Shure site, because that cartridge is compatible with various needles.

And enjoy!!
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Filtering mains clicks/pops Ted205 Power Supplies 5 15th October 2008 04:11 PM
Mains pops and clicks markiemrboo Chip Amps 10 9th September 2007 10:57 AM
Clicks & pops with TDA1543 x8 DAC? fluckscapacitor Digital Source 19 18th November 2006 01:11 AM
SPDIF clicks and pops TBM Digital Source 8 11th June 2006 10:44 PM
Clicks and pops when turn dial on switchbox chris ma Everything Else 7 29th June 2002 06:53 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:25 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2