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Old 24th July 2012, 12:28 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
As Jan told you, .
xedited. It's not the freq range he's after, but the actual working of a hpf and lpf, I guess.

jan
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Old 24th July 2012, 12:39 PM   #12
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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No, I think he has a subwoofer etc. and he wants to know how to choose the crossover frequencies. The full answer has to be "go away and read books on filter theory and electroacoustics, then find out/measure the bare response of your speakers in your room, then choose crossover freqs which gives flattest/most impressive response for the type of music you listen to" but that won't help him very much.
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Old 24th July 2012, 01:25 PM   #13
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Googling lpf and hpf would have given him what he wanted....
Wikipedia is your friend.
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Old 24th July 2012, 02:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janneman View Post
It's not the freq range he's after, but the actual working of a hpf and lpf, I guess.

jan
You are correct. This is what I am after, so some helpful information would help me understand more about hpf and lpf.

Thanks
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Old 24th July 2012, 03:05 PM   #15
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Quote:
=janneman;

Edit: you mean that you need to know how a hpf or a lpf works? It's all in the name.
If your midrange can handle say 100Hz to 3kHz, you set a hpf at 100Hz, that wil 'pass' all signals above (higher than) 100Hz to the midrange.
You then set a lpf at 3kHz which will 'pass' anything below 3kHz to the midrange but progressively cut of signal above 3kHz. Does that answer it?

jan
Yes you are correct.


Here is more frequency setup.Bass 35hz to 90hz , midbass 80hz to 250hz, midhighs 200hz to 1.5 khz and highs 1.5khz to 20000khz.

I just need some help on how to apply the hpf and lpf to the difference frequencies.

Thanks.
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Last edited by wintermute; 25th July 2012 at 12:23 PM. Reason: fix broken quote
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Old 24th July 2012, 04:21 PM   #16
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Now I don't understand what you are asking. If you want to know how a filter works, then Google is your friend. You don't seem able to ask a meaningful question with enough supporting information for us to answer it.

One thing which might help is if you set a country flag. Then someone who speaks your native language may be able to help you express your question.
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Old 24th July 2012, 05:12 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olsound View Post
Yes you are correct.


Here is more frequency setup.Bass 35hz to 90hz , midbass 80hz to 250hz, midhighs 200hz to 1.5 khz and highs 1.5khz to 20000khz.

I just need some help on how to apply the hpf and lpf to the difference frequencies.

Thanks.
Did you understand this:

Quote:
janneman; Edit: you mean that you need to know how a hpf or a lpf works? It's all in the name.
If your midrange can handle say 100Hz to 3kHz, you set a hpf at 100Hz, that wil 'pass' all signals above (higher than) 100Hz to the midrange.
You then set a lpf at 3kHz which will 'pass' anything below 3kHz to the midrange but progressively cut of signal above 3kHz. Does that answer it?
jan
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Last edited by wintermute; 25th July 2012 at 12:24 PM. Reason: fix quote
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Old 24th July 2012, 05:49 PM   #18
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[QUOTE=janneman;3102667]

Edit:
If your midrange can handle say 100Hz to 3kHz, you set a hpf at 100Hz, that wil 'pass' all signals above (higher than) 100Hz to the midrange.
You then set a lpf at 3kHz which will 'pass' anything below 3kHz to the midrange but progressively cut of signal above 3kHz. Does that answer it?

jan[/QUOTE

Does the same method goes for sub, midbass and highs.

Yes, i think I get it now.

Sorry for the poor english.
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Old 25th July 2012, 07:55 AM   #19
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[QUOTE=olsound;3102979]
Quote:
Originally Posted by janneman View Post

Edit:
If your midrange can handle say 100Hz to 3kHz, you set a hpf at 100Hz, that wil 'pass' all signals above (higher than) 100Hz to the midrange.
You then set a lpf at 3kHz which will 'pass' anything below 3kHz to the midrange but progressively cut of signal above 3kHz. Does that answer it?

jan[/QUOTE

Does the same method goes for sub, midbass and highs.

Yes, i think I get it now.

Sorry for the poor english.
Yes indeed! Just fill in the right frequencies for each range.
It helps to draw a graph for this.
Horizontal axis from 20Hz to 20kHz.
For this purpose you don't really need a detailed vertical axis, just label it 'high' and 'low'.
Mark all xover points on the hor scale and then draw for each range a line 'high' between the xover points, sloping down to 'low' on either side of the range. For a 4 way system you'd get 4 of these mountain-like curves. I always use different pencil colors for each range.
Pick a range and it is clear that going from left to right you first need a hpf and then on the right side a lpf.

If you are not confused enough ;-) : a hpf also can be seen as a low-cut filter, and a lpf a hi-cut filter. The graphs I described before make that abundantly clear.

jan
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Last edited by jan.didden; 25th July 2012 at 07:58 AM.
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Old 25th July 2012, 12:05 PM   #20
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[QUOTE=janneman;3103725]
Quote:
Originally Posted by olsound View Post

Yes indeed! Just fill in the right frequencies for each range.
It helps to draw a graph for this.
Horizontal axis from 20Hz to 20kHz.
For this purpose you don't really need a detailed vertical axis, just label it 'high' and 'low'.
Mark all xover points on the hor scale and then draw for each range a line 'high' between the xover points, sloping down to 'low' on either side of the range. For a 4 way system you'd get 4 of these mountain-like curves. I always use different pencil colors for each range.
Pick a range and it is clear that going from left to right you first need a hpf and then on the right side a lpf.

If you are not confused enough ;-) : a hpf also can be seen as a low-cut filter, and a lpf a hi-cut filter. The graphs I described before make that abundantly clear.

jan
Got it. i will post the graph later.
Btw I am alway confused. lol
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Last edited by olsound; 25th July 2012 at 12:16 PM.
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