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Old 18th February 2009, 03:39 PM   #1
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Default Interconnects question.

Hi,

I bought some DH labs b1 wire to build some interconnects. I've built interconnects before, but I came across a youtube video - where the guy connected the drain wire to one end of a rca plug.

He said it had something to do with eliminating hum in the cables you build.

I've already built my pair just stripping back the drain wire, and they sound great.

Just wondering if that was necessary?
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Old 18th February 2009, 09:50 PM   #2
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Default Do you know what you want?

The B1 is a shielded twisted pair cable. If you want to use the shield you have to connect it to ground at one end and float and insulate it at the other end of the cable. Don't connect the drain wire at both ends or it just becomes another signal conductor. So what do you want to do? Do you want to use the shield or not?
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Old 19th February 2009, 12:41 AM   #3
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I didn't connect the shield wire to anything, just peeled it back and trimmed it.

I guess the cables are ok then.

Thanks,
JG
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Old 19th February 2009, 01:16 AM   #4
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Default That will work fine...

this way you maintain the common mode noise rejection of the twisted pair. You might find it worth your time to tie the shield at the source end of the interconnect to ground and have a listen. This will reduce the noise both picked up as well as radiated by the interconnect. You will get to decide if you like the sound better with the shield or without but it will be quieter with the shield. If you like the lower noise but still prefer the interconnect unshielded then find yourself an unshielded quad cable and wire it up as a star quad so the wires will connect going around the quad as pos neg pos and negative. This will give you 6 db less noise compared to a twisted pair cable yet with no overall shield. You can go with a conductor size half of what you have in the twisted pair since you will be doubled up running the star quad configuration.
You should also listen to your cables in both directions as you will find that they will sound different one direction vs the other. The direction that sounds best to you is the right direction.
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Old 19th February 2009, 03:50 PM   #5
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Thanks,

I'll consider building a pair with the shield attached to one end of the cable next time.

I guess the same can be said for a pair of speaker wires. I'm going to try my hand on a pair of twisted cat 5 cables.


Thanks again,
JG
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Old 20th February 2009, 12:02 AM   #6
pfcs49 is offline pfcs49  United States
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You should also listen to your cables in both directions as you will find that they will sound different one direction vs the other. The direction that sounds best to you is the right direction.


why would a cable work better in one direction than another?
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Old 20th February 2009, 06:38 AM   #7
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Default the simple answer?

I don't know why but I do know that it does. My best guess would be that it has something to do with the dielectric on the wire. Take a coaxial digital cable and listen to it in both directions.
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Old 20th February 2009, 01:07 PM   #8
kim707 is offline kim707  Australia
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Default Re: the simple answer?

Quote:
Originally posted by moray james
I don't know why but I do know that it does. My best guess would be that it has something to do with the dielectric on the wire. Take a coaxial digital cable and listen to it in both directions.

I experienced similar results,here is what I've found,quality of copper plays an important role in the directivity of sound for example the purer the copper the more directive it is also the dielectric of the cable what kind of substance it is made this too
has directivity charactiristics but this is just scratching the surface
of the complex nature of the cable

kim
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